Archive for the 'Sustainable Pace' Category

Second book is coming soon…

COVER

It’s six years since Pomodoro Technique Illustrated was published. It’s translated into many languages and there’s 250 000 copies sold. Now, the sequel is almost here.

Cover image for my second book is ready. Full manuscript is written. Chinese publisher signed and translator is working hard. English publisher to be presented soon. It’s an exciting time. I hope you’ll enjoy the book and that it’ll make you more successful.

Busyness Fallacy

busyness-fallacyBeing busy is either our procrastination strategy or else our inability to organize our lives well. Busy people are perceived as important. They even feel they’re important. But, being busy isn’t to be productive. A 100% workload leaves us with no time to take on new important tasks.

People who were asked to calculate their hourly wage before listening to a short piece of music, were more impatient while the music was playing.[1] They wanted to do something more profitable. The widening gap nowadays between can-do and doing is also busyness driving.

Tim Ferriss wrote that the options are almost limitless for creating busyness.[2] Why not commit yourself to produce quantities of documents? Or else you can make sure you have key roles in all ongoing projects. Above all, be a link in as many chain of commands as possible.

The busyness fills our calendar with meetings and other hardscapes. Thus, we can never deliver what we committed to at those meetings. It’ll overload our cognitive capacity. Fight-or-flight mode will crowd out our analytical proficiency. Priorities become inflexible.

Idleness is, paradoxically, necessary to getting any work done. You’ll see the wholeness and make unexpected connections.[3] And replacing unpredictable deadlines with timeboxing makes you more adaptable to change. A good start is to never use the word busy as an answer.

[1] DeVoe S. E., House J. – Time, money, and happiness: How does putting a price on time affect our ability to smell the roses?, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Volume 48, Issue 2, March 2012.
[2] Ferriss T. – The 4-Hour Work Week: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich, Random House, 2007.
[3] Kreider T. – We Learn Nothing: Essays and Cartoons, Simon and Schuster, 2012.

Volunteer Hour — Strategy for Quick and Smooth Interruption Recovery

volunteer-hourMy client Saša was convinced that she couldn’t possibly work in time boxes. She was always interrupted by subordinates [1]. Her observation was that it’s a part of her manager role to be at the heart of things, to always be prepared to help others. In the latter, she was right.

We tried that she blocked an hour after lunch every day in her calendar. We called it the volunteer hour. When colleagues requested her helping hand during the day, she — instantly without dissecting the problem — scheduled a 15-30 minute meeting in her next volunteer hour.

The concrete and simple action plan, made her interruption recovery smooth and quick. No momentum was lost for the task she focused on before she was interrupted. On days where no requests for help appeared, she spent her volunteer hour on discretionary work.

Naturally, there are exceptions. When Saša could answer a question from the top of her head, she did so immediately. Sudden high-risk tasks also had a higher priority than her volunteer hour strategy. But, how often can a task not be deferred a few hours?

Already after a few weeks, Saša told me how successful the volunteer hour strategy is. She used it also for incoming phone calls that required more thoughts and discussions. An added bonus was the fact that the Zeigarnik effect [2] let her subconsciously process the task ahead.

[1] Wajcman, Judy, Rose, Emily – Constant Connectivity: Rethinking Interruptions at Work, Organization Studies, vol. 32 no. 7 941-961, July 2011.
[2] Zeigarnik, Bluma – Das Behalten erledigter und unerledigter Handlungen. Psychologische Forschung 9, 1-85, 1927.

Your Email Inbox as Kitchen Sink or Bookshelf?

inbox-zeroDo you manage your email inbox similar to your kitchen sink or your bookshelf? The answer will not only disable or enable your ability to practice Inbox Zero — the habit to regularly process your inbox to empty. It’ll also put you in either cognitive exhausted or cognitive alert mode.

You bought a new book and read it. Now you want to put it in your bookshelf, which unfortunately happens to be full. You skim the spines and almost randomly remove one book to give room for your new book. Bookshelf is left unsorted. Do you recognize this? Probably.

Your kitchen sink is full of a combination of leftovers and plastic packaging materials. You throw a glance and rather randomly decide to remove the cucumber parts and leave everything else in the same mess as you found it. Do you recognize this? Absolutely not.

Understanding, deciding, recalling, memorizing, and inhibiting are the five functions that make up the majority of our conscious thoughts. They are intensive glucose and oxygen consumers. Overuse makes us feel exhausted. Managing the inbox as a bookshelf relies on all five.

Kitchen sink cleaning is not completed until everything is removed. Every single email must be deleted, archived or put in a to-do folder. Inbox zero is not a continuous state. Analogous to the kitchen sink cleaning, we ought to do it 2-3 times a day.

The Three Laws of Priority Dynamics

leave-100.jpgThe laws of priority dynamics describe how quantities like priority and productivity behave under various circumstances.

0. Every task you said unreserved ‘yes’ to have equal priority. Saying ‘yes’ to many things implies that you believe they can be done in random order. A prioritized to-do list is not a yes-list, it’s rather a list ordered by task importance.

1. Priority can neither be created nor destroyed. It can only be transferred from one task to another. When you raise the priority of one task, you automatically lower the priority of all other tasks.

2. The uselessness of a previous prioritized to-do list, always increases as time goes by. If you don’t re-prioritize regularly based on your recent knowledge, then your plan is doomed to be dysfunctional.

3. Trying to do everything at the same time gives the same result as doing nothing: you will not complete anything.

Efficiency, Productivity, and Effectiveness

In the area of time management – or attention management which is a more accurate term – the three words efficiency, productivity and effectiveness are sometimes misused as if they were interchangeable. And if they are not blurred in that way, they are often wrongly considered as three competing horses, where you have to make a bet on one and not the other two. However, their mutual interdependency is strong.

  • Efficiency is often about speed. How fast can you execute a sub procedure? And even better: how fast can you execute the very same sub procedure one trillion times? More general it’s about consuming as little resources – doesn’t have to be time – as possible, while executing your sub procedure. An efficient person or organization excel and doesn’t waste any energy, time, or resources. But you might not deliver anything in the end.
  • Productivity is about creating a complete product. The result of your work is a whole; a thing that can be used. Efficiency is very important for productivity. Suppose that a mail is a product. The mail must at least consist of a letter and a stamped envelope with the receiver’s address. Efficiency without productivity is to impressively fast create 100 stamped envelopes, but no receiver’s address and no letter. It would be more productive to produce 10 complete mails with letter, stamp and address, in the same span of time. Low efficiency impedes productivity. If you write the addresses really slowly, then in the end of the day you might only have produced one single mail. Productivity is the ratio of produced output to supplied input. If you never ship anything, then produced output and the ratio is zero, no matter how hard you’ve worked.
  • Effectiveness is about creating products that matters. I mean things that add value to other contexts, systems or people. Productivity is very important for effectiveness. Productivity without effectiveness is to write a fabulous business letter, and then send it to 100 random people around the world. The effectiveness is increased if you send the letter to the people who can boost your business. Low productivity impedes effectiveness. Even if you create complete mails, they don’t add any value – cause desired effect – if they’re not sent to the right persons.

So, effectiveness relies on productivity. And productivity relies on efficiency. In a pull based attention management method, you start with effectiveness. Your choice of intended effect will guide you to the best kind of productivity, which in turn will help you see what sort of efficiency you need.

Pomodoro Technique Illustrated -- New book from The Pragmatic Programmers, LLC

Separate the Zebra from the Herd

From Zebra Herd To Kanban

From Zebra Herd To Kanban.

Suddenly it was crystal clear to me. The evolutionary story of the stripes of the zebra told me why I don’t have to fail. I had so many important tasks to carry out. I fought the in-box from dusk to dawn. I reacted to new ideas and added them to Work-In-Progress. And the most important tasks remained undone. They hid in the herd.

The zebra stripes confuses the lion. Each individual’s stripes blends in with the stripes of the herd fellows around this particular zebra. The lion has trouble picking out any one zebra and he’s got no plan for how to attack. He can’t even understand in which direction the zebra is moving. The predator doesn’t see a prey, it can only see a lot of stripes – hundreds or thousands – moving around in an unpredictable pattern.

Each zebra is an activity in our To-Do. We are the lion that needs to focus on one zebra at a time. Our Work-In-Progress mustn’t be the number of individuals in the zebra herd. Our effort to complete any task, depends on our success in separating a zebra from the herd. And even more: to complete the most important task – to be maximum effective – we must separate the right zebra from the herd.

Great news is that there are good practices that come to rescue. The Now List is mandatory, i.e. you must limit the work in progress. You must also understand that focus mode (completing tasks) and overview mode (classifying, sorting, and prioritizing tasks) are not compatible. You need to alternate frequently between these two modes — in a controlled way. And a third practice is to visualize all potential upcoming activities. The recipe goes: create the big picture, choose your target, and don’t constantly switch.

Pomodoro Technique Illustrated -- New book from The Pragmatic Programmers, LLC