Colophon of Pomodoro Technique Illustrated

Recurrently, I’m asked about what tools I used to create the book Pomodoro Technique Illustrated. A colophon is a brief description describing production notes relevant to a edition of a book.

Here’s the Colophon of Pomodoro Technique Illustrated:

I made the drawings in an A6, top spiral, 80 sheets pad from Esselte. The pad is Nordic Swan environmentally labeled and the sheets has 5×5 mm squares, no holes, and wood free 60 gr/m2 paper.

I did the pencil drawings with a BIC Matic mechanical pencil with 0.7 mm HB leads. Then I added water color from a Color & Co paint set filled with 6 tempera blocks in Size 2 (Ø 57 mm and altitude 19 mm) and in the following colors: Gold Yellow, Carmine, Ultramarine, Brilliant Green, Black and White. Finally, I scanned them with a HP Photosmart 1200 Photo Scanner in 300 dpi, 24-bit color.

The spiral pad, the mechanical pencil, the watercolor paint set and the photo scanner are all inexpensive, simple tools. I’m convinced that the content, the ideas and the way something is explained is more important than the quality, the sophistication, and the price of the tools.

In the running text, I use Goudy Old Style, a serif typeface originally created by Frederic W. Goudy in 1916. Headlines have Franklin Gothic, a sans-serif typeface designed by Morris Fuller Benton in 1902 and probably named after Benjamin Franklin.

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5 Responses to “Colophon of Pomodoro Technique Illustrated”


  1. 1 danielbrolund 2009-04-17 at 07.31

    For some peculiar reason I find this kind of information very interesting! :-)

    I think the book is beautiful and the simplicity of the drawings makes them come to life in a delightful way.

  2. 2 Peter Krantz 2009-04-17 at 08.24

    I find it amazing that a lot of agilists are immensly interested in discussing tools. Is it a side effect of studying programming (which in itself is a way to create tools)? Are the tools that important for our work? Sometimes I feel like we are struggling with that particular part of the agile manifesto.

    Nevertheless I found your description very interesting. However, you should really use pre-wet watercolor paper when using water colors.

    No wait, aaargh!

  3. 3 Staffan Nöteberg 2009-04-17 at 10.13

    >> Peter

    Couldn’t agree more! To quote myself: ”I’m convinced that the content, the ideas and the way something is explained is more important than the quality, the sophistication, and the price of the tools.”

    To avoid misunderstandings: I’m speaking about physical or software tools, not techniques like Mind Map or Ishikawa Diagram.

    >> Daniel

    Thanks!

  4. 4 leon 2009-05-21 at 11.44

    I really like the art work and feel inspired to follow suit in my own Presentations.


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